Delamination Problem

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Bligh
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 9:43 pm
Location: Mandurah, WA

Delamination Problem

Post by Bligh » Wed Jan 11, 2012 5:08 pm

Hi guys,

I'm experiencing a recurring problem with the fibre glass on the cross beam of my Snell Easy.

With the normal stresses and strains of sailing, micro cracks are appearing, water is getting into the timber beam which expands and widens the cracks.

The boat wright that I've consulted says that it will always be a problem with fibreglass over a stressed timber beam and suggested maybe I think of stripping off the fibreglass and painting the beam.

Amyone had similar experience and any thoughts on a long term solution?

teamROAM
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:03 pm
Location: Beaumaris, Tasmania

Re: Delamination Problem

Post by teamROAM » Wed Jan 11, 2012 6:45 pm

Bligh

Without looking at it or some pics very hard to give you an answer but your subject line really says it all.

Basically with any de-lamination problem you need to remove all the unsupported glass (bubbled up or cracked shit), dry out the core (timber in your case) and re fiberglass it.

Before you do any drastic work I'd run your problem past the designer. From what I hear Peter Snell seems like a good guy and will most likely get you going in the right direction. He may also want to know about any areas for improvement etc if the issue is not restricted to your boat?

I expect the solution will be to prep and re glass the beam (or at least the effected area). Bit of work but doable. The ship right you have spoken to doesn’t sound like he has done much composite construction. I have not seen a easy forebeam drawing but the fiberglass is there for a reason and that is strength. If you strip the glass off and just paint the beam it will not be as strong as it was with the fiberglass on. Hopefully this will be all there is to it as replacing the entire beam will be a mission (but also doable although will look a little scary) as it goes under the deck all the way out to the side of the boat on the first frame back from the bow.

Don’t leave it too long as water in the wood is not good…..

Mick

puremajek
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Location: Brisbane Australia
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Re: Delamination Problem

Post by puremajek » Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:26 pm

The ship right you have spoken to doesn’t sound like he has done much composite construction.
I strongly echo this sentiment.

I am aware of one other occasion. HOWEVER (as was later found out by their Yacht Insurance mob), it was not built to plan????? :shock: :shock: :shock:
  • Were you the builder? and
    Any idea if it was it built to plan?
I expect the solution will be to prep and re glass the beam (or at least the effected area). Bit of work but doable.
Agree with this too and there are a million ways to skin a cat. But, I would be on the blower to Peter Snell ASAP. He will have a fix for you.

Having first hand experience at building that area, I know the curve you speak of and think its not the beam, rather 'the way the timber was applied' and 'the curve'. In placing my ply (and in liaison with the designer), I used 3 layers of 4mm rather than 2 of 6mm.

Would like to hear how you go
James
James
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http://www.diycatamaran.com
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Bligh
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 9:43 pm
Location: Mandurah, WA

Re: Delamination Problem

Post by Bligh » Thu Jan 12, 2012 3:13 pm

Thanks for the input guys. I will talk to Peter. I wasn't the builder. so not aware of the ins and outs.

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