BIPOLAR

Build logs from members building catamarans, trimarans and other multi-hull variants.
michaelo
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:44 am
Location: Melbourne

BIPOLAR

Post by michaelo » Sat Dec 11, 2010 4:51 am

Long time between photos




















Smooth Cruiser
Posts: 583
Joined: Thu May 11, 2006 1:51 am
Location: Brisbane

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Post by Smooth Cruiser » Wed Dec 15, 2010 7:59 am

Good to see a front companionway - one of the advantages of a bi rig that I can see is that it opens up this area for you.

mahnamahna
Posts: 580
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 4:48 pm
Location: Gosford NSW

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Post by mahnamahna » Wed Dec 15, 2010 8:13 am

Its just a shame that the designer has engineered uni rope troughs in the top of the bulkhead. If he had not have done that you would not have to climb over it with a ladder and could have made a walkway with gradual steps out in the space between the bedrooms. I think Darwin cat has a doorway through the front of the cabin also in his bi rig cat, with a forward cockpit I think. Tom?

darwincat
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 8:27 am
Location: a bit south of Darwin

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Post by darwincat » Wed Dec 15, 2010 10:28 am

Good day, We are still have a large compression type beam as per the 1230's however we did move it forward to facilitate the installation of our main bunk on the bridge-deck to port then a 1500mm x 1000mm fwd cockpit in the centre and then an inside helm/nav area to starboard. The fwd cockpit is still aft of the beam and will have a door from the cabin and all three sides will also have a combination of hatches and opening portlights. The helm can be handled when outside in the cockpit.



I have been advised that for bi rigs the shell could, if all the old design paradigms where thrown away, have the main forward beam much more forward and be also a minimum of 150mm high. This would mean it would match most door bases to ease forward access.



Bear in mind that this may not be too palatable to those who think that forward access/ front cockpits etc. is an invitation to the sea.



Oh, and BTW Bipolar, I love your addition it looks excellent.



Regards.

michaelo
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:44 am
Location: Melbourne

BIPOLAR

Post by michaelo » Sun Feb 27, 2011 3:20 am

At last windows are in and the weather is out









Big milestone, the trampolines are the first and only completely finished

things so far.








teamROAM
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:03 pm
Location: Beaumaris, Tasmania

BIPOLAR

Post by teamROAM » Mon Feb 28, 2011 9:35 pm

Looks great!!



Bi Plane rig defiantly makes for a neat foredeck!!! No striker, no forestay fitting etc and no weight I guess.



Mick

michaelo
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:44 am
Location: Melbourne

BIPOLAR

Post by michaelo » Wed Mar 02, 2011 2:34 am

The whole foredeck area will be rather open and uncluttered but also with nothing to hold onto, especially when doing the Titanic " i'm king of the world" pose,

mahnamahna
Posts: 580
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 4:48 pm
Location: Gosford NSW

BIPOLAR

Post by mahnamahna » Wed Mar 02, 2011 2:49 am

michaelo wrote:The whole foredeck area will be rather open and uncluttered but also with nothing to hold onto, especially when doing the Titanic " i'm king of the world" pose,


For this reason I am considering glassing 2 stanchions to the forebeam so that I can extend lifelines across the front.



I need 2, one either side of my catwalk as it will have a hinged ladder inside it (I have built it with 100mm depth and a hinged lid will sit atop it and act as the catwalk when closed, also inside the lid is a chain trough so that as the anchor chain is raised I can hose off any mud along the chain before it enters the hawse pipe, windlass and anchor locker).



With the catwalk lid opened the ladder will hinge over the forebeam (between the 2 stanchions) and down to the beach or to a jetty if I nose in to one, and beneath it also hinged on the same pin at the front of the forebeam as part of the anchor roller set up, will be a gangplank that sits inside the ladder and combined they will sit on a pier either above or below the height of the forebeam depending on the height of the pier as a gangway onto it, and because it is hinged it can swing up and down with the rise and fall of the tide.



I will design the catwalk lid to be closable with the ladder stowed or deployed.



It will make a lot more sense once I have pics of the hinge and pin set up, an expence I am not looking forward to, as it will all be 316 S/S and incorporate a bow roller that can accomodate the shaft of a CQR or like anchor.



Another benefit of not having the striker was the ability to have this ladder/gangplank set up.

teamROAM
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:03 pm
Location: Beaumaris, Tasmania

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Post by teamROAM » Wed Mar 02, 2011 4:27 am

True it would be exposed and mahnamahna's couple of stanchions probably a good idea even if just for kids etc at anchor. You would have less reasons to go fwd at sea too though…



Not sure about the boarding ladder in the cat walk though. We had one in our previous cat and only used it once. Unless you are going to charter it and have a specific pick up beach like they do at Waikiki I personally think lot of effort for something that is difficult to use IMHO. Ours ended up with Swallows nesting on the rungs under the lid and then the poor nest and eggs got annihilated every time we took the boat offshore not to mention the mess birds make…..

mahnamahna
Posts: 580
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 4:48 pm
Location: Gosford NSW

BIPOLAR

Post by mahnamahna » Wed Mar 02, 2011 7:22 am

teamROAM wrote:True it would be exposed and mahnamahna's couple of stanchions probably a good idea even if just for kids etc at anchor. You would have less reasons to go fwd at sea too though…

Not sure about the boarding ladder in the cat walk though. We had one in our previous cat and only used it once. Unless you are going to charter it and have a specific pick up beach like they do at Waikiki I personally think lot of effort for something that is difficult to use IMHO. Ours ended up with Swallows nesting on the rungs under the lid and then the poor nest and eggs got annihilated every time we took the boat offshore not to mention the mess birds make…..


We have a pier here at Gosford that is much lower than the bows of a cat and if you nose in, as many do, getting up and down to a bow about a meter or more in the air and a meter away from the edge is difficult for some, I can do it but my small wife would struggle, we know because we often went aboard a friends cat tied up this way, a gang plank onto the catwalk would have solved this and made embarking disembarking a breeze, even with both hands full of provisions, but he has a stay and striker so could not do that. Another time on his boat we nosed into Palm Beach on Pittwater, with our ladder we could dismebark without even getting our feet wet! But on his boat we had to jump down, and getting back on via the bows, forget it, we had to wade around to the stern that was getting quite deep as we nosed in on a rising tide so that we would float off again soon. Now most of you would say so what, put on your swimmers and get wet and on our own boat we would fully agree, but we were day guests on an unexpected stop, and did not have a change of clothes so did not go ashore for the impromptu barbecue. Plans like that might often change unexpectedly and having the ladder might mean the difference.



It reminds me of the old John Wayne saying, "its better to have a gun and not need it than need a gun and not have it".



Our ladder box is sealed by the lid that is only open by 2 slots at the beam so that the lid can be closed with the ladder out so nesting birds should not be a problem even if the ladder is not deployed for some time, but I take your advise and may devise a brush system to keep the slots closed when the ladder is not deployed. Building the extra depth in the catwalk was simple, but there will be some expense in the stainless steel hinge/bow roller set up. The ladder will probably be just an aluminium ladder with appropriate rubber sheathing for connection to the stainless so as to aviod/minimise electrolysis. I have thought about making a glass reinforced ladder but doubt I will do this, but I am sure we will use ours heaps especially as a gangway, so think it is worth the trouble.

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