Plumbing...

Tips and tricks, suggestions and ideas to help make the final product comfortable inside
groper
Posts: 239
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2012 11:23 am
Location: cairns

Plumbing...

Post by groper »

So im thinking about how im going to setup the freshwater systems in the boat... so far im thinking to basically plumb everything the same way its done in a new house... All done in that hard plastic pipe with those plastic compression fittings... nothing to rust, and they seem to be quite reliable in terms of leaks...

So what i was going to do is basically the same as a domestic plumbing install except instead of the mains feed, have a pressure demand pump drawing from the freshwater tank, which supplies everything from there including the instantaneuous hotwater system, bathrooms, kitchen, deckwash etc etc... so the whole system will be pressurized to ~50psi at all times whilst aboard, and when ashore simply switch off the pressure demand pump.

How have you guys setup your plumbing on board?
Jim
Posts: 691
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 8:25 am
Location: Cairns

Re: Plumbing...

Post by Jim »

Exactly as you said. I used Whale plastic/nylon fittings, and haven't had one drop leak in 4 1/2 years. I used red hose for hot and blue for cold. They don't give them away, but well worth the price.
Jim.
mySerenity
Posts: 755
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Brisbane Australia
Contact:

Re: Plumbing...

Post by mySerenity »

Spot on. All plumbing in non-accessable spots is HP piping and glued, the rest is flexible quick connect. We have had a quick connect leak that emptied 350 of water into one of the hulls. Still love the stuff though. Would use Whale or John Guest, forget about Hep2O.

Many have deck wash to saltwater. I have since removed mine, found it a waste of time. Found I was using a bucket over the edge instead of the hassle with hose pipes. Have since installed two connections externally from the internal freshwater pump.

Not sure if desalination is on the to-do-list yet? If so, this may require freshwater for auto-flushing every 4-7 days, in which case the pump will need to be plumbed and wired 'hot'. Some install a second 'hot' pump for this???? We have one pump that does everything and carry a second as a spare.

Wiring - its a good idea to switch all power off on departure. However, there are some components that you may want to keep 'hot' or alive. Our 'hot' components include the bilge pumps, AM FM radio (standby), freshwater pump and security/alarm.
James
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groper
Posts: 239
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2012 11:23 am
Location: cairns

Re: Plumbing...

Post by groper »

Ok sounds like a goer then... i hear ya on the electrical stuff, had the same plan...

what about the shower in the bathroom, are you simply putting a bilge pump in a sump with slats to stand on then lift the waste water above the waterline before dumping it out the hull side?

Yes i would like a desalinator if its not going to be a huge drama... its a difficult proposition in my boat tho, im not going to have heaps of excess electricity capacity to run it, no diesel engines or permanent gensets etc, so i was thinking about a petrol engine driven HP pump or perhaps having to start a Honda 2 type genny to run a small electric motor driven pump... pickling it and all that sounds like a pita... i need to give it some more thought as to whether to really need it, i know it would be nice to have tho...
Smooth Cruiser
Posts: 583
Joined: Thu May 11, 2006 1:51 am
Location: Brisbane

Re: Plumbing...

Post by Smooth Cruiser »

Ditto with the quick connect.

For the shower sump drain, rather than a seperate through hull consider plumbing it into a Y piece with the bathroom sink drain - this is how mine is and works well, only thing you notice is a gurgling noise in the sink when the pump runs.

Desalinators don't need auto flushing if you pickle them prior to storing them - which is fairly painless really.
Jim
Posts: 691
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 8:25 am
Location: Cairns

Re: Plumbing...

Post by Jim »

Like James I have a salt water deck wash pump fitted, however I have never plumed it in, so never used it or wanted to, If I must hose anything down I just connect my normal washing hose to the deck shower and use that, though only around Cairns where water is no problem. When I am away I just use salt water and a bucket.
My shower drain is just a bilge pump up and through the hull. The sink drains into the shower sump. I had to put on/off valves on both the hull bilge pump hoses as well as the shower because for whatever reason when under way in anything over 10 knots they draw in water. I have scuppers on the exits facing back and down but they don't seem to work. What I will do the next time the boat is on the hard is glue some 90 deg fittings into the outlets and put some flat plastic hose about 300 mm long on the ends to keep the water from getting back in. The valves I installed work fine but it is just something else to remember.
Jim.
tiller3d
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2013 12:50 pm

Re: Plumbing...

Post by tiller3d »

Hi Guys,
New to this forum but agree 100% with using Whale quick connect 15. It is all we use in the work shop and never had bad feedback. Plenty of fittings to choose from and looks neat and tidy.

For a bit more info that might answer some of your questions check out an article on my website ,would love the feedback.

http://theboatbuildingsite.com.au/freshwater.html
Tiller3d
44c
Posts: 1148
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 5:08 am
Location: Hervey Bay, Qld

Re: Plumbing...

Post by 44c »

groper wrote:Ok sounds like a goer then... i hear ya on the electrical stuff, had the same plan...

what about the shower in the bathroom, are you simply putting a bilge pump in a sump with slats to stand on then lift the waste water above the waterline before dumping it out the hull side?

Yes i would like a desalinator if its not going to be a huge drama... its a difficult proposition in my boat tho, im not going to have heaps of excess electricity capacity to run it, no diesel engines or permanent gensets etc, so i was thinking about a petrol engine driven HP pump or perhaps having to start a Honda 2 type genny to run a small electric motor driven pump... pickling it and all that sounds like a pita... i need to give it some more thought as to whether to really need it, i know it would be nice to have tho...
A bilge pump can work in a shower sump, but.... you tend to get lot's of hair and stuff which pretty quickly clogs up centrifugal pumps. Also you'll get backflow when you switch it off.

The best shower sump pumps are the Whale "gulper" types. Big diaphragm pumps. But really expensive. I've just used a small pressure pump, like you'd use for the water supply onboard. With an inline gauze strainer. Because they are fitted with non return valves, you don't get the backflow. They also self prime, and don't mind running dry. And can lift much higher than bilge pumps, if needed.

I just have a manual switch for it. Our old boat had a sump with a bilge pump and automatic (level) switch, and sometimes it would cycle on and off as the pump stopped, the backflow returned to the sump, raised the level, started the pump again...

IMO watermakers are absolutely fantastic if you live aboard full time. They love constant use. Run it every day, or every other day, and they give no trouble at all. And not having to constantly think about where you're going to get water from next, for months or even years at a time, is wonderful.

If you're only weekending and holidaying, they can be an expensive hassle. And for that use, you can almost certainly get by without one. Let's face it, not so long ago EVERYBODY got by without them!
mahnamahna
Posts: 580
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 4:48 pm
Location: Gosford NSW

Re: Plumbing...

Post by mahnamahna »

I built sumps under the soles (one in each hull). I have everything drain to the sumps then have bilge pumps with float switches to pump up to a holding tank in each hull, which then has a gravity out via a stop valve, in case grey water overboard is not permitted in some areas.

I built oversized sumps with large chlorine bucket lids as cleaning/inspection ports, so the top of the bucket with the thread is glassed into the boat and the lid forms the floor. All of the drains (shower, bathroom sink, kitchen sink, laundry sink) drain into the sumps and have stockings over the ends of the pipes that drain into the sump to catch hair etc, and held on with elastic bands.

They will need washing/replacing but I reckon only once or twice a month, replace stocking end, turn old one inside out and wash (in the ocean behind the boat while having a swim) ready for next rotation. I also diverted the kitchen waste directly overboard via a Y valve, the other side of the Y into the sump when in a nil discharge area, but will try to avoid using or directing sink waste into sump to avoid tiny food scraps getting into the sump. Inside of sump painted with high gloss so is easy to wipe clean.

I also used whale plastic throughout, red hot, blue cold and grey for fresh water from eventual watermaker back to my tanks (2 x 300l wrenko tanks but only one will have watermaker water in it). I have a tank for each hull and a pump for each, but also have a system of taps so that I can draw water from either tank with either pump and direct it to either hull or both or transfer water from one tank to the other.

I will have a fresh water deck shower (cold only) with ability to attach hose for deck wash, but also a salt water deck wash circuit off my watermaker feed.

I intend to plumb a shore water in and isolate the pumps so that when in a marina I can use shore water through the system and turn pumps off. A one way valve straight after the pumps will isolate them and a one way valve at the other end will stop water escaping when shore water is not connected, pretty much the same way shore power will work except for the water circuit.
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