Uber survey

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mahnamahna
Posts: 579
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 4:48 pm
Location: Gosford NSW

Uber survey

Post by mahnamahna » Wed May 18, 2016 6:24 pm

In the County Court in Victoria today, a man had his appeal against a conviction upheld and won costs from the Gov. His conviction was for operating (as an Uber driver) a commercial vehicle for hire without the proper permits and holding a taxi license.

Many states are yet to legislate or have their existing laws being tested by ride share technology. The technology only puts the driver and the fare together, nothing else.

I wonder what implications Uber, rideshare and peer to peer services could have on survey laws.

If it is proving difficult for governments to stop Uber taking on the taxi industry (where taxi operators have paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for a taxi license) and the only requirement therefore for an Uber driver is to be approved by Uber and have a registered roadworthy and less than 10 year old vehicle (an Uber requirement I believe) and a valid driving license, then it may follow that in order to take a paying passenger on a boat a survey may no longer be required and simply a registered and seaworthy vessel? This of course would need to be tested in court but has the precedent been set?

Will this make survey laws as redundant as taxi laws?

Thoughts.

Finally
Posts: 211
Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2009 9:24 am
Location: Cairns

Re: Uber survey

Post by Finally » Wed May 18, 2016 10:34 pm

We don’t have “Uber” where I live but you say that to become an Uber driver you must have a road worthy vehicle (under 10 years of age).

To be “Roadworthy” you would need a “Roadworthy Certificate” which is issued by a Government authorised station. These stations issue certificates provided the vehicle meets a minimum standard. I am assuming here that the minimum standard is set in legislation somewhere - which probably varies from state to state.

So, how do you determine the “Seaworthiness” of a vessel. As far as I am aware, the only way to “prove” seaworthiness is to have your vessel “surveyed”. And I’m pretty sure that a surveyor would not issue a Survey Certificate unless it met survey requirements. In other words the boat is considered “Under Survey” which will then allow you to “charter” your vessel.

I am probably wrong here, but your reference to “Taxi Laws” refers to who is allowed to drive a “Registered Vehicle” for benefit. Irrespective of whether you are a “Taxi” driver or an “Uber” driver you both must have a roadworthy vehicle.

So, in short, in answer to your question “Will this make survey laws as redundant as taxi laws?” the answer is “No”. Simply because you still need a road/seaworthy vehicle to transport your passengers.

mahnamahna
Posts: 579
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2006 4:48 pm
Location: Gosford NSW

Re: Uber survey

Post by mahnamahna » Thu May 19, 2016 9:17 am

Oh yeah I completely forgot that in order to register a new boat you simply tell them its dimensions and load carrying ability and then just pay the annual fee and they do not inspect the vessel at any stage. In NSW a "boat code" plate is attached by an authorised agent, but this is more a security plate like a vin plate and has nothing to do with structural integrity.

Survey is an interesting beast in regards to this conversation vis a vis uber because there are different survey classes. Anybody can have a survey done, but for a non commercial "recreational" survey is usually only for insurance or resale purposes. I wonder if in future it will be used like a roadworthy.

Apparently you cant even get fuel money to takes mates out fishing. I wonder if the "uber" precedents will have any implications on maritime laws.

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