watermakers

Suggestions on keeping the cook happy
northerncat
Posts: 849
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 5:55 pm
Location: cairns
Contact:

watermakers

Post by northerncat » Fri Jun 09, 2006 10:15 pm

does any one have one? and if so how much did it cost and how much water does it make? i would be interested in something that made around 10-15l an hour

sean

Smooth Cruiser
Posts: 583
Joined: Thu May 11, 2006 1:51 am
Location: Brisbane

watermakers

Post by Smooth Cruiser » Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:48 am

I have one - it is supplied by HydroGen. It is a mechanical pump - clutch driven off a one cylinder diesel motor. It makes about 80L per hour.



The whole package - the diesel motor with all water cooling and protection circuits, the water maker, and a 120A alternator clutch driven as well was around the $12,500 mark.



While this is expensive the end result is fantastic in terms of self sufficiency in power and water. As a result I can do long extended trips with no need for large tanks or constant stopping for water.

puremajek
Posts: 751
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Brisbane Australia

watermakers

Post by puremajek » Thu Jun 15, 2006 5:14 am

Smooth Cruiser



I’ve tried to locate their website, you couldn't give a pointer or two. :(



What sort of diesel use (quantity) do you have and can you remember the decibel noise rating it is supposed to carry. The price you quoted appeared to me to be OK as many of the desalinators I've seen don't have their own power generation units and come at that same price. The diesel engine/alternator you have, is that hooked up for battery charging too?



And lastly if its not to rude, how often do you carry out maintenance on the unit and are the cartridges expensive?



I am sitting on the fence at the moment regarding one of these.
James
______________________________________________
http://www.diycatamaran.com
http://www.puremajek.com
______________________________________________

Smooth Cruiser
Posts: 583
Joined: Thu May 11, 2006 1:51 am
Location: Brisbane

watermakers

Post by Smooth Cruiser » Thu Jun 15, 2006 5:29 pm

I am pretty sure the company is called HydroGen - could be HydraGen. They are in Scarborough I believe. It is a guy who builds all sorts of power generation, solar systems etc.



I am not on the boat at the moment but when I get back I can post an address and phone number and more details.



The engine is a one cylinder diesel Kubota - the same engines used in a lot of farm applications for water pumps from remote tanks etc. It burns around about 400ml an hour of diesel. When cruising I run it for about half an hour to an hour a day for both battery charging and water making.



The unit is fairly low maintenance - especially if used regularly. If you are using it all the time then you don't do anything to it. If you have been using it and are not going to use it for more than 5 days then you need to flush it and fill it with fresh water and bactericide - a solution of metabisulphite (same as used to clean bottles, pipes etc in home brewing). This is fairly easy. Once you have done that, the system can be closed up and left indefinitely with no bacterial growth.



I haven't replaced the membranes in 5 years - and the pressures are still the same. I think they are relatively expensive, however I know from working previously with RO plants that the membranes can be sent away and reconditioned once or twice before they need replacing. My unit has two pre filters at 10 microns and 1 micron and these get changed every few months, depending on how clean the water is where you are, but they are only a few dollars each.



I see this as a good way to go - there is a little bit of weight in the setup but it then allows you to carry much smaller water tanks and save weight that way. Also there is no need for a wind generator with the noise and weight.



In terms of noise of the diesel, it is salt water cooled and exhausts through a water seperator below the water line. It is in the cupboard under the single bed in the front of the guest cabin and the cupboard is well sound insulated. It runs all closed up with all of the cushions in place and all of this helps keep the noise down. You can certainly hear it and it is pleasant when it is turned off, but it is not too intrusive, turn the stereo on and it doesn't trouble you!



As I say I will post more info once I get back to the boat (mid next week) and can even take some photos etc if you are interested in going that way.
Last edited by Smooth Cruiser on Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

puremajek
Posts: 751
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 7:36 pm
Location: Brisbane Australia

watermakers

Post by puremajek » Sun Apr 01, 2007 2:51 am

Desalinator, made in New Zealand. Wrote to Terry Forsbrey with a general inquiry at Christmas 2006 and this was his reply.
We build engine driven and 240 volt electric water makers only as we believe that they are by far the most reliable products available. It was my experience while cruising the 12 volt models seemed to be very complicated and less than reliable. As an owner of one of those units I vowed to build a water maker that was simple, reliable, made heaps of water and was as affordable as possible. After 10 years in the Caribbean and the Pacific I arrived in New Zealand, liked what I saw started OpenOcean Watermakers Ltd.
Below are the specifications for the Electric model:
Each standard unit comes with the following Parts:
1. High pressure pump capable of running up to three large membranes.
2. An industrial 2.2kw single phase electric motor
3. A 12 volt 3/4" boost pump
4. A control panel
5. One Large membrane and membrane vessel
6. 5 meters high pressure hose
7. Fittings, orings, pickling powder
8. Installation, Operating and trouble shooting manuals

The whole unit is modular and can be installed anywhere on the boat.
The boat can be designed with smaller water tanks and bigger fuel tanks as our units are that reliable!
The unit weighs approx 65 kilos or the same as 65 liters of water.
It will produce up to 75 liters Per hour in warm tropical waters!
The dimensions are as follows
High pressure pump 510X310x260mm high
Control panel 420X330x50mm deep
Membrane vessel 1150mm X 85 mm Diameter
Boost pump very small

Pricing as follows
70 liter per hour electric watermaker $4900.00 Aus. Plus shipping
140 Liter per hour $6400.00 Aus Plus Shipping
210 Liter per hour $7900.00 Aus Plus Shipping

The engine driven water makers are the same price.

Cheers
Terry Forsbrey
OpenOcean Watermakers




Another option I suppose.



An old electrical hand told me too that one needs a generator 3 times as much as the motor its to drive. In this case I suspect that means 6kw to overcome the inertia and drain characteristics associated with electric motors at startup with this particular unit. :cry:



Anyone know if electric motors have changed in the last 10 - 20 years? Soft-start units have come some way to resolve these dilamas I suppose, but are still not the answer.



Any thoughts :?:
James
______________________________________________
http://www.diycatamaran.com
http://www.puremajek.com
______________________________________________

northerncat
Posts: 849
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 5:55 pm
Location: cairns
Contact:

watermakers

Post by northerncat » Sun Apr 01, 2007 8:40 pm

i was in autobarn the other day looking for a presure cleaner, they stock the gerni range and on the box i read that their pumps are not affected by corrosive substances, i have always been attracted to the idea of using a gerni for the pressure pump part as it would mean you could use it to clean your boat down at marinas or when dried out on a beach

sean

Smooth Cruiser
Posts: 583
Joined: Thu May 11, 2006 1:51 am
Location: Brisbane

watermakers

Post by Smooth Cruiser » Sun Apr 01, 2007 11:56 pm

puremajek wrote:An old electrical hand told me too that one needs a generator 3 times as much as the motor its to drive. In this case I suspect that means 6kw to overcome the inertia and drain characteristics associated with electric motors at startup with this particular unit. :cry:


I know that electric motors have a start up current of around 3X their normal draw, whihc is I assume why you need the larger generator. I would have thought though that a generator could supply the extra current needed briefly, and that maybe one only 1.5-2x larger would do the job. Field trials would be the only way to test this though.



A bit un-related but I know that my 1000W inverter will start a 770W electric motor that draws 2300W on start up. The inverter flashes but can supply this short term kick required. Maybe a generator can handle this extra load briefly without stalling??

northerncat
Posts: 849
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 5:55 pm
Location: cairns
Contact:

watermakers

Post by northerncat » Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:14 am

well i have a 5.5l/pmin washer 1.3kw i just have to find some one with a 2-3 kva genny to see if it'll run it,

sean

malallo

watermakers

Post by malallo » Mon Apr 02, 2007 8:58 pm

Hi Guys I use this website to calculate genset sizes http://www.macgen.com/calcul. and the ratio for calculation is pretty close to what smooth cruiser said. the reason an inverter unit will start a bigger load is that it has capacitors, that store energy to bridge the gap between load and engine RPM, as when unloaded they are at idle. you will find that an unloaded pressurewasher will take less than half the load to start as is stated on the spec sheet Last year I manufactured a watermaker for a freind out of a gernie and a few bits and pieces the total cost was about $1700.

Shane

northerncat
Posts: 849
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 5:55 pm
Location: cairns
Contact:

watermakers

Post by northerncat » Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:21 am

come on shane, that info is a tease, i for one would dearly love to know what kind of pressure washer, what genset you used to run it and where you got your membranes from, also what was the output?

sean

Post Reply